The VW Tiguan is pricier than some rivals, but it delivers a desirable package of practicality, technology and quality

The Tiguan isn't a very exciting car to drive, but then neither are many of its closest crossover rivals. However, this second-generation model is good at many of the things that matter in its class. There’s lots of room inside for a growing family, the cabin is very well built and, although it’s a little dull inside, it’s now crammed full of the latest tech. Overall, this is an extremely well rounded package, and while it lacks personality, it ticks a lot of boxes.

Volkswagen Tiguan vs Renault Kadjar vs Nissan Qashqai

It’s not cheap compared to the Mazda CX-5 and Ford Kuga, though, as VW has priced the Tiguan above the 'jacked-up Golf' segment it used to compete in and more towards the likes of the BMW X3. It's nearly as good as a premium SUV, but not quite - and that means the SEAT Ateca and Peugeot 3008 put it to shame for value while coming close in terms of quality.

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Volkswagen Tiguan 2.0 TDI 150 SE Nav

The second-generation Volkswagen Tiguan arrived in 2016, and it builds on the appeal of the original with extra kit, more technology and a premium image inspired by the Golf hatchback. In fact, the Tiguan is a big seller for VW, coming in third in the charts behind the aforementioned Golf and Polo supermini. And just to demonstrate the Tiguan's importance, it now comes in two body styles - the standard five-seat model and the extended, seven-seat Tiguan Allspace.

The Tiguan range is similar to the Golf's, save for the performance, electric and hybrid versions that model offers. That means the model range kicks off with the S model, then moves to SE, SE Navigation, SEL and R-Line. There are clear differences between the four core trims, and if you parked an S next to an R-Line, you could easily tell which one is on sale for a lot more than the other. Indeed, prices range from just over £23,000 to just under £40,000, although that does mean all models only cost £140 a year in road tax, which will be less than some premium models. However, you need to be careful adding options to the highest spec models, as they could push prices beyond this mark.

Engines are 1.4 or 2.0-litres in size, with two petrols and a diesel offered in a variety of outputs. The 1.4 TSI comes in 125 and 150 guises, which have 123bhp and 148bhp respectively. The lower powered engine only comes in S and SE trims, and only comes with front-wheel drive and a six-speed manual gearbox.

The 148bhp 1.4 TSI features ACT, Active Cylinder Technology that shuts down cylinders on light throttle loads to boost fuel economy. As a result, the ACT engine returns better fuel economy than the lower powered 1.4 TSI, with 49mpg, compared to 47mpg for the 125 unit. In addition, the 150 TSI is available with VW's slick six-speed DSG gearbox, 4MOTION four-wheel drive, or both together.

The 2.0 TSI 180 has 178bhp, and only omes with SEL and R-Line trims. It comes with 4MOTION four-wheel drive as standard, while this engine features VW's seven-speed DSG box as an option.

Go for a diesel, and there are four versions of VW's 2.0 TDI unit. It comes in 115, 150 and 190 forms, with 113bhp, 148bhp and 187bhp respectively, while at the top of the range is the BiTDI 240 twin-turbo with 237bhp. The lowest powered diesel only comes in S trim with a six-speed box and front-wheel drive, and VW quotes the same economy and emissions figures for it and the 150 version in the same configuration. However, the more powerful TDI can be had with 4MOTION four-wheel drive, VW's seven-speed DSG box, or both together.

Further up the range, the 190 and 240 TDIs both have the seven-speed DSG and 4MOTION as standard. The 190 comes in all trims bar S, while the BiTDI is exclusive to SEL and R-Line models.

4.4
4.4/5
Strong refinement, with a firm but controlled ride
4.1
4.1/5
Nearly 60mpg for the most efficient Tiguan will tempt family buyers, but no variants are the most frugal in their class
4.4
4.4/5
More onboard tech and solid design inside and out
4.3
4.3/5
Larger boot and more passenger space than most rivals will appeal
3.7
3.7/5
Safety is good but VW will be hoping the Tiguan improves reliability reputation

Volkswagen has tried to move the Tiguan upmarket with the Mk2, but that does mean it's not such good value when compared to some of its rivals. While the Tiguan is similar in size to cars like the SEAT Ateca, Skoda Karoq, Peugeot 3008 and Nissan Qashqai, its prices are similar to the larger Skoda Kodiaq. If you consider the VW as an alternative to models like the BMW X3 and Audi Q5, then it looks better value, but for some people VW still isn't a brand that can match the perceived premium image of these models.

Still, if you take the plunge, you shouldn't be disappointed with the quality and kit on offer, even if you can buy more spacious models for a similar price.

Last updated: 
24 Sep, 2018